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Old 01-27-2021, 07:46 AM
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Default Hester Diamond Sothebys auction

https://www.sothebys.com/en/articles...hester-diamond

There is some rare Beastie's memorabilia in there. Including a chance to buy one of their MTV moon man awards for about $10k
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Old 01-27-2021, 10:35 AM
Sir SkratchaLot Sir SkratchaLot is offline
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Insane. I didn't see the Beastie's stuff, but that's an amazing collection.
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Old 01-27-2021, 11:31 AM
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Default Re: Hester Diamond Sothebys auction

https://www.sothebys.com/en/slidesho...ilia?locale=en



Long Burn The Fire. Rest In Peace Adam.

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Old 01-27-2021, 12:55 PM
tuc70021 tuc70021 is offline
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Default Re: Hester Diamond Sothebys auction

Holy shit. Multi-million dollar pieces there. Never quite realized how loaded the D's were.

Seems really weird that Mike is selling his gold and platinum records. I'm a big collector, but even I wouldn't really want to pay that much for them. Seems like they'd have way more sentimental value to the person who actually made the records...
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Old 01-27-2021, 01:40 PM
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Default Re: Hester Diamond Sothebys auction

I accidentally stumbled on a profile of his mom and her art collecting the other day while I was looking for something else, and I was also kind of blown away by the amount of money. I guess his dad became an art dealer as a way to make ends meet and was pretty successful, and when he died his mom kept collecting art with the foundation his dad left behind. Doesn't seem like they were born loaded or anything, but I could be wrong. The profile made a point of mentioning that she was a social worker and her husband was a teacher before becoming an art dealer. There's some quotes from Mike about having famous people in the house and how formative it was to discuss art with his parents growing up. In terms of the level of money spent on this stuff, it probably doesn't hurt that her son was in a successful band

I just tried the track down the article I read, but I'm pretty sure it just quoted from the Sotheby's stuff so the OP link will probably lead you to what I was reading.



If this is gonna be that kind of party, I'ma stick my dick in the mashed potatoes!


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Old 01-27-2021, 04:50 PM
3stooges 3stooges is offline
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Default Re: Hester Diamond Sothebys auction

I don't know alot about art, but my understanding is the market is mostly very wealthy people, who have money to burn. So if you are knowledgeable, and shrewd about how you buy and sell, you can make a fortune. Also, the fact that she has been doing it so long, she probably has things she bought when they were basically new, for not that much, that are now considered a rare piece of history, and these rich folks are willing to shell out whatever it takes to own it, they don't even think about it that much, because they have so much money.
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Old 01-27-2021, 05:56 PM
tuc70021 tuc70021 is offline
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Doesn't seem like they were born loaded or anything, but I could be wrong. The profile made a point of mentioning that she was a social worker and her husband was a teacher before becoming an art dealer.
There's a part in Beastie Boys book where Mike D recalls his mom thinking that escaping the Bronx for Manhattan was "making it" in life, so I assume you're right. Probably had more money than you average New Yorker at the time, but then really cranked up the cash with the art dealing stuff.
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Old 01-27-2021, 05:59 PM
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Default Re: Hester Diamond Sothebys auction

here's the article, it was in the times a few weeks ago.

long but a good read.



thank you adam adam & mike

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Old 01-27-2021, 10:33 PM
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Holy shit. Multi-million dollar pieces there. Never quite realized how loaded the D's were.
Most people know that they all came from an upper middle class background.
The older I have gotten and the more I understand the type of money certain careers net, the more I have realized that they were probably closer to the upper category than the middle class one. Architect, Established Playwright, Art Dealer, homes in the Upper West side.

All of which is something they have never denied, yet is something they never really went out of their way to talk about either. Which is fine, cause in the end, it doesn't really matter.

There is a reoccurring story with art, fame and pop culture and generally success. We all love the story of the person with the last $12 in their pocket sleeping in the back of their car. But on a closer look there are a lot of artists who have had some huge advantages that the others don't; Ben Stiller / Jerry Stiller, Anthony Kiedis and his babysitter Cher, Maya Rudolph / Minnie Riperton, Rashida Jones / Quincy Jones, Drake's uncle was in Sly and The Family Stone.
Dwayne The Rock Johnson loves telling his rags to riches story but he also had connections through his father and grandfather mixed with a gift of genes, talent and drive that others can't even comprehend. And the list goes on.

All of this is not discrediting peoples raw talent, skills and ambition, and there are many successful artists that have come from nothing and risen from obscurity. But there is also a lot who have had a huge advantage that the layman would never realize.

Again, something that Beastie Boys have never denied. And they have had the skills to pay the bills mixed with untouchable creativity and an insane drive and work ethic.

"Luck Is What Happens When Preparation Meets Opportunity"

But I think it's an important thing to note that not everyone had some of the advantages they were privy to i.e. having free studio access to record Cookie Puss because their parents friends were returning a favour. Knowing the right people to talk to or how to conduct themselves in those circles when talking to those people. i.e. During the making of Paul's Boutique, Mike D casually mentioning to Joe Smith, the CEO of Capital Records "You bought a Brach from my father"

Not taking away from their talent and integrity but just another layer to their story that I have started to recognize that sometimes might be overlooked.

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Originally Posted by tuc70021 View Post
Seems really weird that Mike is selling his gold and platinum records. I'm a big collector, but even I wouldn't really want to pay that much for them. Seems like they'd have way more sentimental value to the person who actually made the records...
Same, I don't know if I would get anything from having those in my collection. It has always seemed that they don't really value the award stuff (moon men, grammy's), which I have always admired and respected them for.

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I guess his dad became an art dealer as a way to make ends meet and was pretty successful, and when he died his mom kept collecting art with the foundation his dad left behind. Doesn't seem like they were born loaded or anything, but I could be wrong. The profile made a point of mentioning that she was a social worker and her husband was a teacher before becoming an art dealer.
Yup, they talk about that in this video here: https://www.sothebys.com/en/digital-...0610?locale=en

Really cool story. I agree, I don't think they were born into it, but I don't think they were too hard done by either.
There was one part where they mentioned that they used to rent art pieces for $25 a month when they were first starting out. Myself and most of the people I know would cancel Netflix if they raised it by 50 cents, so renting art pieces for $25 a month is money and a lifestyle that is a completely foreign concept for a lot of people.

I don't know much about art but can bullshit about it a bit. They said one of the first pieces they acquired was a Henry Moore, from my basic knowledge on Moore, that is not a cheap way to start your collection.

Mike or the rest of the band has never really flaunted their affluence, which is a common trait I have found with the few legit wealthy people I have actually met compared to imposters who always make a point of demonstrating it and shoving it in your face.

As usual, I don't know what know what I am going on about anymore but always enjoy the great discussion that is had on this forum.

Let me know if any of you guys cop some cool shit from the auction!

Last edited by brooklyndust : 01-28-2021 at 12:35 AM. Reason: you all know my grammar and spelling is shite
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Old 01-27-2021, 11:09 PM
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Default Re: Hester Diamond Sothebys auction

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I don't usually say this, but check out the comments section in the article. Some cool stories, and of course the usual disappointment in humanity.
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Old 01-27-2021, 11:11 PM
tuc70021 tuc70021 is offline
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Default Re: Hester Diamond Sothebys auction

Agree with everything brooklyndust said.

I knew the Beasties had a relatively privileged upbringing, but it wasn't until I read Beastie Boys book that it really stood out to me (again, not in a bad way, just kind of hit me later in life). So much of the early part of the book was about how they spent their teenage years just going to Danceteria, Roxy, etc. and all the crazy fun they were having. It crossed my mind that if I wasn't working every day after school from age 14 on my family and I probably would have just died of exposure. When I was younger I used to think "Man, maybe I should have just said fuck it." Then I remember that we only think that's cool when it works out - which it usually does for wealthier people - but when some broke ass kid parties instead of works, we just call him a loser when he inevitably ends up a broke ass man.

But anyway, I'm glad their parents had their shit together enough to give those dudes the time and resources to become my favorite band.
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Old 01-28-2021, 05:57 AM
3stooges 3stooges is offline
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The other thing to think about is all the privileged kids that had the same opportunities that never did anything. Or they tried to do something but they were just bad at it. This story is alot more common than the success story. And then we have people who came from nothing with zero connections who ended up just making incredible stuff that couldn't be denied. In the end it seems it doesn't really matter either way, it's the artist and the art itself that matters, and not where it came from or what happened beforehand.
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Old 01-28-2021, 07:45 AM
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The other thing to think about is all the privileged kids that had the same opportunities that never did anything. Or they tried to do something but they were just bad at it.
Yup, good point. If you don't have the talent, innovation and drive / work ethic then it can only get you so far.

And I'm sure there is more that come from nothing then those who had the advantage. I think it's just an important thing to note, especially for younger artist just starting out. Tell them the whole story to set expectations but not squash dreams.

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Old 01-28-2021, 11:22 AM
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Agree with everything brooklyndust said.

I knew the Beasties had a relatively privileged upbringing, but it wasn't until I read Beastie Boys book that it really stood out to me (again, not in a bad way, just kind of hit me later in life). So much of the early part of the book was about how they spent their teenage years just going to Danceteria, Roxy, etc. and all the crazy fun they were having. It crossed my mind that if I wasn't working every day after school from age 14 on my family and I probably would have just died of exposure. When I was younger I used to think "Man, maybe I should have just said fuck it." Then I remember that we only think that's cool when it works out - which it usually does for wealthier people - but when some broke ass kid parties instead of works, we just call him a loser when he inevitably ends up a broke ass man.

But anyway, I'm glad their parents had their shit together enough to give those dudes the time and resources to become my favorite band.
Yeah, even just having the money to go out. At that age I was lucky to have like $20 in my pocket that I could spend freely. I don't know what the prices were like at NYC clubs in the early 80s, but I doubt they were partying every night for free. I remember there being kind of a rift at a certain age where kids start going out more (for me this was around 18, so I had more than $20... maybe like $200 in the bank), when I had to say no to a lot of my friends because I didn't have the disposable income they had. Or I'd say yes and next thing I know I have like $5 to my name.

Not trying to say I had it so hard and the Beastie Boys were spoiled brats that didn't know how good they have it, it just seems clear they may not have ever become what they are if they didn't have disposable income, stable living situations and parents that were willing to let them go out and do what they wanted at a young age.



If this is gonna be that kind of party, I'ma stick my dick in the mashed potatoes!


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Old 01-28-2021, 02:17 PM
BeesTea BeesTea is offline
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Default Re: Hester Diamond Sothebys auction

I just reread the BBB bible so some of their childhood narrative is still fresh in my mind. Although MD grew up in a relatively affluent household, it seems as if the the 2 Adams came from more middle-class backgrounds. While I am sure Israel Horowitz was comfortable as a relatively well-known playwright, I think I had read that Adam had lived with his mother and even used her maiden name as his surname suggesting to me that maybe dad wasn’t involved with his kids post-divorce (that definitely could be my personal bias).

AY’s parents were a social worker and architect. Again, these are professions that provide a secure but hardly lavish lifestyle.

I have also read that some of their friends were very good at inking fake handstamps so they could get into venues. I always assumed it was because of an minimum age issue but maybe it was also to avoid cover charges.

I think what DID help the 3 is they each had at least one parent who was in an artistic field. Perhaps their parents were more accepting of following one’s dreams vs going to college at 17 and 4 years later be ready to embark on a lucrative, safe career.


In terms of Hester and her husband: venturing into modern art in the 1950s was fortuitous timing. The Space Race and Cold War were funding technology developments even to labor-saving devices for one’s home. The Beat Generation was developing. I think a lot of the culture at that time carried over into style choices.

Then she switched her specialty to the very different genre of Old Masters. It could have been because she was now a widow and the modern style was always more of her husband’s thing than her true preference. Her switch occurred when Reagan was in office and the I-bankers were doing very well until 10/87.

All of this is conjecture on my part so it’s just my two cents.
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Old 01-28-2021, 03:50 PM
Sir SkratchaLot Sir SkratchaLot is offline
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Originally Posted by BeesTea View Post
I just reread the BBB bible so some of their childhood narrative is still fresh in my mind. Although MD grew up in a relatively affluent household, it seems as if the the 2 Adams came from more middle-class backgrounds. While I am sure Israel Horowitz was comfortable as a relatively well-known playwright, I think I had read that Adam had lived with his mother and even used her maiden name as his surname suggesting to me that maybe dad wasnít involved with his kids post-divorce (that definitely could be my personal bias).

AYís parents were a social worker and architect. Again, these are professions that provide a secure but hardly lavish lifestyle.

I have also read that some of their friends were very good at inking fake handstamps so they could get into venues. I always assumed it was because of an minimum age issue but maybe it was also to avoid cover charges.

I think what DID help the 3 is they each had at least one parent who was in an artistic field. Perhaps their parents were more accepting of following oneís dreams vs going to college at 17 and 4 years later be ready to embark on a lucrative, safe career.


In terms of Hester and her husband: venturing into modern art in the 1950s was fortuitous timing. The Space Race and Cold War were funding technology developments even to labor-saving devices for oneís home. The Beat Generation was developing. I think a lot of the culture at that time carried over into style choices.

Then she switched her specialty to the very different genre of Old Masters. It could have been because she was now a widow and the modern style was always more of her husbandís thing than her true preference. Her switch occurred when Reagan was in office and the I-bankers were doing very well until 10/87.

All of this is conjecture on my part so itís just my two cents.
Good points. Also remember that Adrock's mother was renting out a room (presumably to make ends meet).

I think the fact that Mike's family is/was well-to-do but but he's still running wild in the streets during his highschool years is pretty cool. It may be that his folks had a lot of nice art but did not have tons and tons of expendable cash at the time. It may be that they were rich, but he wasn't! It doesn't seem like his parents were giving him tons of money. Look where he was living in the LTI era, a rat infested apartment.

It also doesn't appear that their money (or lack thereof) had a huge direct impact on their success in the music biz. They had the instinct/luck to gravitate towards Rick Reuben. Had that not happened they probably wouldn't have made it very far in hip hop despite their raw talent.
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Old 01-28-2021, 06:35 PM
Sir SkratchaLot Sir SkratchaLot is offline
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Mike posted on Instagram about the auction.
https://www.instagram.com/p/CKmEQPfM...=14tywjz4ope2d
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Old 01-29-2021, 01:04 PM
M|X|Y M|X|Y is offline
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There is a reoccurring story with art, fame and pop culture and generally success. We all love the story of the person with the last $12 in their pocket sleeping in the back of their car. But on a closer look there are a lot of artists who have had some huge advantages that the others don't; Ben Stiller / Jerry Stiller, Anthony Kiedis and his babysitter Cher, Maya Rudolph / Minnie Riperton, Rashida Jones / Quincy Jones, Drake's uncle was in Sly and The Family Stone.

Dwayne The Rock Johnson
...
But I think it's an important thing to note that not everyone had some of the advantages they were privy to i.e. having free studio access to record Cookie Puss because their parents friends were returning a favour. Knowing the right people to talk to or how to conduct themselves in those circles* when talking to those people. i.e. During the making of Paul's Boutique, Mike D casually mentioning to Joe Smith, the CEO of Capital Records "You bought a Brach from my father"

Not taking away from their talent and integrity but just another layer to their story that I have started to recognize that sometimes might be overlooked.
...
Mike or the rest of the band has never really flaunted their affluence.
Absolutely. I have always respected their modesty. They're definitely down to earth dudes who always seemed to understand that their success is due to a combination of talent and work but also luck, timing and certain privileges. Who HASN'T wished to be the kid of wealthy parents. They could've done much less with themselves and brought nothing to the world, so I'm happy they lived the way they did.

*Holy motherfuck is that true and mostly overlooked. Practice makes perfect and sometimes you only get one shot.


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It also doesn't appear that their money (or lack thereof) had a huge direct impact on their success in the music biz. They had the instinct/luck to gravitate towards Rick Reuben. Had that not happened they probably wouldn't have made it very far in hip hop despite their raw talent.
It doesn't appear that way, but it's a lot easier to let go and follow your heart when in the back of your mind you know family'$ got your back. RR, an NYU kid from well off family, needed them as much as they needed him. They were all better off as a group.

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It crossed my mind that if I wasn't working every day after school from age 14 on my family and I probably would have just died of exposure.
...
But anyway, I'm glad their parents had their shit together enough to give those dudes the time and resources to become my favorite band.
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Yeah, even just having the money to go out. At that age I was lucky to have like $20 in my pocket that I could spend freely. I don't know what the prices were like at NYC clubs in the early 80s, but I doubt they were partying every night for free. I remember there being kind of a rift at a certain age where kids start going out more (for me this was around 18, so I had more than $20... maybe like $200 in the bank), when I had to say no to a lot of my friends because I didn't have the disposable income they had. Or I'd say yes and next thing I know I have like $5 to my name.
I remember this rift around this age too. Just getting around was a pain in the a$$. I definitely missed out on a LOT of fun from not having money or having to work.

It felt like the kids with money didn't need to think of their futures as seriously. Letting go and "enjoying" their youth came at a lower cost in the sense that being carefree isn't as easy when you know there is no safety net. Having encouraging and $upportive parents vs parents constantly brow beating you into making something of yourself. Or no parents. These things make a huge difference. Even if they weren't actually spending parents' money, just the absence of the kind of stress that struggling families go through is an invisible but very real advantage.

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It's the artist and the art itself that matters, and not where it came from or what happened beforehand.
Everyone agrees on that - the point is that it's a lot harder to 'become an artist' or to get out there for most vs the ones you've heard of.

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I think it's just an important thing to note, especially for younger artist just starting out. Tell them the whole story to set expectations but not squash dreams.
I think kids should learn this too. Nowadays there are so many accessible ways to make art, it's totally possible to just make things for the love of it. It's just a fact that you see more successful people that come from privilege in the arts, as opposed to say, mechanics or even doctors. It's almost like telling a short person they can be the next Michael Jordan. Sure, it's possible and there have been short players, but it's just highly unlikely. Right now pro basketball is a game dominated by tall people. It just is.

There are many more attainable paths to happiness and $uccess. Shit, look at the lady the thread is about. Plus - we need like ten new good singers a year. Tops.

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I think what DID help the 3 is they each had at least one parent who was in an artistic field. Perhaps their parents were more accepting of following one’s dreams vs going to college at 17 and 4 years later be ready to embark on a lucrative, safe career.
Yeah, it could even be that we got what we got from them as artists BECAUSE their parents were creatively encouraging. Not everything is about money. My parents were also creative types. These influences are also privileges vs kids who dont have them. They had great parents that provided high-level exposure to things that made them who they are to us.


I imagine MCA's architect pop may've exposed him to things that had something to do with his technical and design abilities, and all those contributions to the band.

I imagine that Adrock's theater dad and artist mom had something to do with his humor, his outgoing and performative talents.

I imagine Mike's exposure to his parents' art and work had something to do with his to eclectic musical taste and abilities, eye for design and being the first entrepreneur among them.


Anyway, I liked this thread and wrote too much. In the end we are what we eat and milk does a body good.



PPPS: The comments on the nyt article dust posted above really are worth the read. She seemed like a very cool person, a life well lived: "Ms. Diamond said in 2017 they were motivated to acquire art solely by “the excitement of seeing it, and falling in love with it, and buying it. It was always all about love.”. Clear influence

Last edited by M|X|Y : 01-29-2021 at 03:28 PM. Reason: forgot beasteas' quote
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Old 01-29-2021, 05:01 PM
Sir SkratchaLot Sir SkratchaLot is offline
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Wow, the Beasties stuff sold for huge bucks! It's all going to charity. Very cool.
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Old 01-29-2021, 06:52 PM
3stooges 3stooges is offline
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Everyone agrees on that - the point is that it's a lot harder to 'become an artist' or to get out there for most vs the ones you've heard of.
Yeah, I agree, more opportunity, of course. But I think, especially in certain genres, we see a disproportionately high success rate for people of lesser privilege, as compared too "non-creative" pursuits. A lot of times, kids from money don't have much to say, literally, or creatively.

There could be different kinds of privilege. A poor kid that grows up going to a church that just happens to have a bunch of dope musicians playing there, and they let him hang around the church and play all the instruments 24/7. He's not financially rich, but in other ways, his life certainly is.
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Old 01-29-2021, 10:45 PM
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All of this is conjecture on my part so it’s just my two cents.

Agreed for the whole thread. That is all any of us are doing here, speculating and stating opinions, unless any of us knew them personally, then we don’t really know. And even if you did know them well, you still might not really know the full story. 



But from the Sothebys site they linked this. Which I only skimmed the first part. 

But it does mention how one of Mike’s ancestors came over from Europe and was one of the rare educated ones from that village and then became a banker, but then lost all work during the great depression, but so did everyone else. But if you check the family history, they have a few generations of some cashflow. 
 



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Anyway, I liked this thread and wrote too much.




Same here. To quote a comment from the New York Times article. “The more I learn about the background of the Beasties the more interesting they become.”


I think that’s why I have been hanging on these boards for, holy shit, 18 years! That is just dawning on me now. Almost 20 years with some of you people….
“Same faces every day but you don't know their names”


I keep coming back and one of the main draws is that I find the band incredibly interesting. 

Learning about their individual personal lives is another fascinating level that I wish they delved into more with the book. I would buy and read their individual biographies, but as Ad-Rock said in the book “that’s a stuff for my personal memoirs. Which I just set on fire in my bathtub” so I don’t think that will ever come to fruition. Which I 100% understand. They have always seemed to keep their guard up when discussing their immediate family, and who could blame them? Especially in these times. And on that I hope it’s not too weird (probably is) or disrespectful that we are doing a deep dive on this thread.

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it seems as if the the 2 Adams came from more middle-class backgrounds. While I am sure Israel Horowitz was comfortable as a relatively well-known playwright.

Which is the other side of the coin especially when looking at artists from the outside. A lot of people who are not in the arts sometimes have a big misconception about what artists actually get paid. 

Sure Israel Horovitz is hailed as “the most-produced American playwright in French theatre history”

But that doesn’t necessarily translate to monetary success (although I think it might have in this case). I have met artists who I thought would be loaded but were not, and there are ones that I have never heard of who were. 



but, to your point and


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Also remember that Adrock's mother was renting out a room (presumably to make ends meet).

I also got the impression that Ad-Rock was probably the least privileged of the three. 



Another thought I just realized as I’m typing this. A weird connection is that Mike lost his Dad and Horovitz lost his Mom around the same time. And now Mike just lost his Mom and Horovitz lost his Dad around the same time.

Quote:
Originally Posted by BeesTea View Post
I have also read that some of their friends were very good at inking fake handstamps so they could get into venues. I always assumed it was because of an minimum age issue but maybe it was also to avoid cover charges.




I’m sure that was part of it but more so and to quote the book:

“the drinking age in New York was eighteen and never enforced, you could be thirteen and get into a club no problem"

”

Walking up to the Danceteria: “will you get in? You’re only sixteen but for whatever reason, the doorman Haoui Montaug, likes you, so you slide in” 

“At the Danceteria, there was this really cool relationship between us kids and these slight older grown-ups. And being aging able to go to this place felt like a privilege. I mean shit…. They’d let us in (for free, no less)”



And the inspiration of Egg Raid on Mojo:
”Mojo was the doorman who worked at a few downtown clubs. Sometimes he would let us in for free and sometimes he would not”



I don’t think it was the money that got them into the clubs but more that they were gifted with charisma and charm that helped them with obtaining those opportunities. Whether that was genetically inherited or something they picked up from being around artistic parents. Probably a little bit of both.

 Which brings up

Quote:
Originally Posted by BeesTea View Post
I think what DID help the 3 is they each had at least one parent who was in an artistic field. Perhaps their parents were more accepting of following one’s dreams




Quote:
Originally Posted by M|X|Y View Post
Yeah, it could even be that we got what we got from them as artists BECAUSE their parents were creatively encouraging.




Yup, plus the incubating environment that New York was at the time:

“If we had grown up almost anywhere else in the world, our crew wouldn’t have had such a steady flow of amazing events that we could go to, unaccompanied by parents. First of all in other cites you had to dive to shows, which automatically meant a parent. And second, because all of our parents were Artis or intellectuals, they gave us an unusual amount of of freedom. It was still kind the ‘70s, in terms of parenting. My mom had certain time structures, like, you know, I could be out late on a weeknight. And I had to be clear about where I was and where I was going. But her basic attitude was, if your school work didn’t suffer, you do whatever you want. If it does, we have a problem. Everybody in our inner crew had parents that were, in one way or the other, similarly lenient”


so 


Quote:
Originally Posted by 3stooges View Post
There could be different kinds of privilege. A poor kid that grows up going to a church that just happens to have a bunch of dope musicians playing there, and they let him hang around the church and play all the instruments 24/7.




And they had the privilege of financial security with being surrounded by artists.

NYT article: 

“There were all these artists and art historians and characters from the New York City art world that would permeate most evenings of our lives,” Mr. Diamond recalled. “There were some pretty strongly opinionated folks in that room. So it always seemed completely normal to both my brothers and I that you’d have an opinion about everything. We had a family motto: ‘Often wrong, never in doubt.’”



And comment:



“Not to take away from Mike D nor his parent’s taste in art, but few - regardless of talent - are so fortunate to have the time, security, and opportunity. I am happy that he has done good by it. “

Which they indeed did:

Quote:
Originally Posted by Sir SkratchaLot View Post
Mike posted on Instagram about the auction.
https://www.instagram.com/p/CKmEQPfM...=14tywjz4ope2d


In which Mike says:

 “I was never comfortable holding onto or looking at these awards/accolades that we got through the years. Don’t get me wrong - I’m appreciative of them, it’s just not something I need to look at.

Which answers the question 


Quote:
Originally Posted by tuc70021 View Post

“Seems really weird that Mike is selling his gold and platinum records. I'm a big collector, but even I wouldn't really want to pay that much for them. Seems like they'd have way more sentimental value to the person who actually made the records…”




With 


Quote:
Originally Posted by Sir SkratchaLot View Post
“Wow, the Beasties stuff sold for huge bucks! It's all going to charity.”



“Come on party people share up your stacks" No one can deny that they just don't talk the talk, they walk the walk.

All this reaffirms

Quote:
Originally Posted by M|X|Y View Post
I have always respected their modesty. They're definitely down to earth dudes who always seemed to understand that their success is due to a combination of talent and work but also luck, timing and certain privileges.




NYT article comment:

“I have noticed it’s people who are born on third base acting like they hit a triple that stirs up resentment — especially in conjunction with gatekeeping and punching down to hoard opportunities.

Thankfully there are a lot people who are the opposite. Even if they don’t remove barriers, they root for the underdog.”

Couldn't agree more.

Quote:
Originally Posted by M|X|Y View Post
I think kids should learn this too. Nowadays there are so many accessible ways to make art, it's totally possible to just make things for the love of it.

Which brings up one of my favourite quotes on art: 
“Love the art in yourself,*not yourself in the art” - Konstantin Stanislavski



And from the band 

“we try not to take ourselves too seriously…"

Overall they have always seemed genuinely surprised by their own success.

And 



“Y’all sucked since brass monkey” 



But in the end they have always acknowledged how lucky they were/are



“The odds are stacked for those who lack I been a lucky motherfucker when it comes to that”



And you can't front on that

Last edited by brooklyndust : 01-29-2021 at 10:51 PM.
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  #22  
Old 02-02-2021, 12:25 PM
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easy 3 easy 3 is offline
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Default Re: Hester Diamond Sothebys auction

The Mike stands for Money and the D is for Diamonds...



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